Current Team:

Julie Strandberg

  Julie Adams Strandberg is Senior Lecturer and founding director of dance in the Brown University Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies and co-founder of the American Dance Legacy Initiative housed at the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage and co-founder of ASaP. The four primary goals of Julie’s research are,    1) to provide dancers with holistic, multi-faceted ways in which to be artists in our culture,    2) to advocate for the inclusion of the arts, and particularly dance, in the education of EVERY child,    3) to make connections between her work within the university and the broader culture, and    4) to develop and design materials and programs that provide broad access to dance as an art form to all persons, including pre-professional and professional dancers; students in grades K-university; and the general public.    The inclusion of persons with neurological disabilities, often denied access to the arts, is consistent with that mission. AsaP advances all four of her research goals.

Julie Adams Strandberg is Senior Lecturer and founding director of dance in the Brown University Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies and co-founder of the American Dance Legacy Initiative housed at the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage and co-founder of ASaP. The four primary goals of Julie’s research are, 
1) to provide dancers with holistic, multi-faceted ways in which to be artists in our culture, 
2) to advocate for the inclusion of the arts, and particularly dance, in the education of EVERY child, 
3) to make connections between her work within the university and the broader culture, and 
4) to develop and design materials and programs that provide broad access to dance as an art form to all persons, including pre-professional and professional dancers; students in grades K-university; and the general public. 
The inclusion of persons with neurological disabilities, often denied access to the arts, is consistent with that mission. AsaP advances all four of her research goals.

Rachel Balaban

 Rachel Balaban received her BA from Brown University and has returned as an Adjunct Lecturer in Brown’s Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies (TAPS). She is co-founder and co-director of Artists and Scientists as Partners (ASaP), at Brown where she advocates for arts in healthcare and facilitates studies of the theory and engagement with the practice of the arts in healing.  Rachel continues to train at the Mark Morris Dance Group in Dance for PD (Parkinson’s Disease). She is Dance for PD Coordinator for Connecticut and Rhode Island and regularly teaches People with Parkinson’s and their caregivers. She also teaches Dance for All People (DAPpers) at Brown for people of all ages and all abilities. Rachel is committed to helping people access their vitality and health through the use of their own bodies and to make dance accessible to all populations. She leads movement workshops for schools, faculty, foundations, corporations, hospitals and other healthcare facilities.

Rachel Balaban received her BA from Brown University and has returned as an Adjunct Lecturer in Brown’s Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies (TAPS). She is co-founder and co-director of Artists and Scientists as Partners (ASaP), at Brown where she advocates for arts in healthcare and facilitates studies of the theory and engagement with the practice of the arts in healing.

Rachel continues to train at the Mark Morris Dance Group in Dance for PD (Parkinson’s Disease). She is Dance for PD Coordinator for Connecticut and Rhode Island and regularly teaches People with Parkinson’s and their caregivers. She also teaches Dance for All People (DAPpers) at Brown for people of all ages and all abilities. Rachel is committed to helping people access their vitality and health through the use of their own bodies and to make dance accessible to all populations. She leads movement workshops for schools, faculty, foundations, corporations, hospitals and other healthcare facilities.

Teaching Assistants

Tanushri Sundar (brown '21)

 Lindsey ruda (brown '20)

 Lindsey is a current junior studying Cognitive Neuroscience, with an interest in movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. She is very involved in two of Brown’s student-run dance groups as a dancer and choreographer. She also aims to expand her technique through classes in the TAPS department as well as those offered in the Providence community. Lindsey began her work with the ASaP Team as a student in the class of Fall 2017, and began assistant teaching the Dance for PD classes on Brown’s campus the following Spring. She is very passionate about bringing her loves of dance and neuroscience together in support of art-based interventions for Parkinson’s-affected individuals. Although primarily focusing on Parkinson’s, Lindsey has also worked with the Miracle Project, a theater-arts program for people on the spectrum. She advocates for reducing the stigma surrounding both aging/chronic illnesses and non-neurotypical individuals. 

Lindsey is a current junior studying Cognitive Neuroscience, with an interest in movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. She is very involved in two of Brown’s student-run dance groups as a dancer and choreographer. She also aims to expand her technique through classes in the TAPS department as well as those offered in the Providence community. Lindsey began her work with the ASaP Team as a student in the class of Fall 2017, and began assistant teaching the Dance for PD classes on Brown’s campus the following Spring. She is very passionate about bringing her loves of dance and neuroscience together in support of art-based interventions for Parkinson’s-affected individuals. Although primarily focusing on Parkinson’s, Lindsey has also worked with the Miracle Project, a theater-arts program for people on the spectrum. She advocates for reducing the stigma surrounding both aging/chronic illnesses and non-neurotypical individuals. 

 Tanushri Sundar, undergraduate class of '21, has yet to choose a concentration but absolutely loves studying the brain. She has always been interested in learning about neurodevelopmental disorders and was excited to join the ASaP course in Spring 2018 to study Autism Spectrum Disorder in context of one of her greatest passions, self expression. Tanushri strongly believes in the therapeutic potential of art — through leading creative writing workshops for adults with developmental disabilities, facilitating story-writing sessions for critically ill children, and observing acting classes for children on the autism spectrum, she has witnessed the need for greater research exploring the influence of art on medicine and medicine on art. She is currently preparing to be an Emergency Medical Technician and is looking forward to what the future holds at Brown University and beyond.

Tanushri Sundar, undergraduate class of '21, has yet to choose a concentration but absolutely loves studying the brain. She has always been interested in learning about neurodevelopmental disorders and was excited to join the ASaP course in Spring 2018 to study Autism Spectrum Disorder in context of one of her greatest passions, self expression. Tanushri strongly believes in the therapeutic potential of art — through leading creative writing workshops for adults with developmental disabilities, facilitating story-writing sessions for critically ill children, and observing acting classes for children on the autism spectrum, she has witnessed the need for greater research exploring the influence of art on medicine and medicine on art. She is currently preparing to be an Emergency Medical Technician and is looking forward to what the future holds at Brown University and beyond.

Jane Hong (brown '20)

Natalie Berger (brown '19)

 Jane is a junior concentrating in Science and Society with a focus on “Art and Medicine”. As a pre-med student and visual artist, she is passionate about studying the intersection of art and healing. The trajectory of her studies was very much influenced when she joined the ASaP community as a freshmen in 2016 where she focused on working with children on the autistic spectrum through the arts. She then moved onto become a TA for the course as a sophomore in 2017. This has allowed her to not only develop the course curriculum with Professor Strandberg and Balaban but also pursue research about using art as a healing intervention with School of Public Health and work with young adults on the spectrum through The Miracle Project. She is so excited about working as a TA once again, which will allow her with a wonderfully creative community of artists and scientists. 

Jane is a junior concentrating in Science and Society with a focus on “Art and Medicine”. As a pre-med student and visual artist, she is passionate about studying the intersection of art and healing. The trajectory of her studies was very much influenced when she joined the ASaP community as a freshmen in 2016 where she focused on working with children on the autistic spectrum through the arts. She then moved onto become a TA for the course as a sophomore in 2017. This has allowed her to not only develop the course curriculum with Professor Strandberg and Balaban but also pursue research about using art as a healing intervention with School of Public Health and work with young adults on the spectrum through The Miracle Project. She is so excited about working as a TA once again, which will allow her with a wonderfully creative community of artists and scientists. 

    Natalie is a senior concentrating in Science, Technology, and Society with an independent track in "Literature, Culture and Medicine." She is also enrolled in the FlexMed Program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. As someone who always loved literature, acting, and visual art, Natalie was immediately attracted to the “Artists and Scientists as Partners” course. Through taking both semesters of the course her sophomore year, she discovered the language and the community she needed to form her humanities-centered approach to medicine. As a TA for the course her junior year, Natalie planned, coordinated and ran the annual symposium: "Beauty in the Space of Medicine and Art." Natalie is looking forward to planning the annual symposium again this year and continuing to lecture the class on Artscience and Design Thinking. More importantly, she cannot wait to continue dancing in the DAPers class and spending time as a member of its inspiring community.

 

Natalie is a senior concentrating in Science, Technology, and Society with an independent track in "Literature, Culture and Medicine." She is also enrolled in the FlexMed Program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. As someone who always loved literature, acting, and visual art, Natalie was immediately attracted to the “Artists and Scientists as Partners” course. Through taking both semesters of the course her sophomore year, she discovered the language and the community she needed to form her humanities-centered approach to medicine. As a TA for the course her junior year, Natalie planned, coordinated and ran the annual symposium: "Beauty in the Space of Medicine and Art." Natalie is looking forward to planning the annual symposium again this year and continuing to lecture the class on Artscience and Design Thinking. More importantly, she cannot wait to continue dancing in the DAPers class and spending time as a member of its inspiring community.


Alumni Team: